Andrew E. Epstein, MD

Andrew E. Epstein, MD

Andrew E. Epstein, MD is Professor of Medicine, Division of Cardiovascular Disease, at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. He graduated from Amherst College in 1973 and the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry in 1977. After completing his internship and residency in internal medicine at Washington University, he came to the University of Alabama, where he completed his fellowship in cardiovascular medicine and joined the faculty in 1982. He is board certified in Internal Medicine, Cardiology, and Clinical Cardiac Electrophysiology.

He is a fellow of the American College of Cardiology and the Council on Clinical Cardiology of the American Heart Association. For the latter he has served as chairman of its committees on Sudden Cardiac Death and on Electrocardiography and Arrhythmias. He is currently chair of the ACC/AHA/HRS Guideline Committee for the implantation of cardiac pacemakers and antiarrhythmic devices. He has been chosen as one of the "10 Best Teachers" and in 2006 also received the Clinical Excellence Award in the Department of Medicine, and received the Division of Cardiovascular Disease Teaching Excellence Award all at the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

Dr Epstein’s research interests lie in the management of atrial and ventricular arrhythmias. He has been involved in numerous clinical trials, having chaired recruitment committees for the NIH/NHLBI-sponsored Cardiac Arrhythmia Suppression Trial (CAST), the Antiarrhythmics versus Implantable Defibrillators (AVID) Study, the Atrial Fibrillation Follow-up Investigation of Rhythm Management (AFFIRM) Study, and most recently the DAVID Study. He has authored several hundred papers, abstracts, book chapters, and reviews and has edited two books. He serves on the editorial boards of the Journal of Cardiovascular Electrophysiology, Journal of Interventional Cardiac Electrophysiology, Heart Rhythm, PACE, American Journal of Cardiology, and Current Controlled Trials in Cardiovascular Medicine.